Lowe’s New Holoroom Lets You Try Out Home Improvements Virtually | Digital Trends

Home Improvement Loan – Town Square – North Haven, CT Patch

The Holoroom is our solution, enabling consumers to visualize their project and share that vision with family and friends. The Holoroom, despite its futuristic name, is basically just an empty space that functions as a blank 3D canvas for you to build your virtual home in using special software. The idea is that you fill it with a computer-generated representation of your home, and then apply different colors, textures, fixtures, and materials from Lowes virtual catalog. Then, with the help of an iPad running a special virtual reality application, you can walk around the room to see how everything looks. If you like what you see, you can buy the materials on the spot and head home to install them. If not, you can just dive back into the app and tweak the virtual arrangement until you find the sweet spot.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.digitaltrends.com/home/lowes-new-holoroom-lets-try-home-improvements-virtually-buy/

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“It’s busier than it’s been in years. We’re all grateful for it.” Fremont contractor Dean Henninger supervised a concrete pour in Livermore for a client’s pool house this week, one of several jobs his company is working on. “I’m getting a lot of business,” he said. The remodeling business has been recovering since late 2012 as more homes return to positive equity. Slow housing sales had been a drag on the business because many remodeling jobs are sparked by home purchases.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_25924464/bay-area-home-equity-lending-surges-funding-home

Bay Area home equity lending surges, funding home improvement projects – San Jose Mercury News

Dean Henninger of Oakland, owner of D.W. Henninger Construction, left, watches Bernie Marvin, of Tracy, as he works on the foundation for a pool house in

With a home equity loan you are only paying on the funds you borrow not the all the equity at once. If you have a home equity line of $50,000 but only borrow $15,000 in the first year you are only paying interest on that $15,000 vs. paying on the entire $50K from the beginning. The interest is tax deductable which makes it a more attractive offer compared to using a credit card. 2) Cash out refinance – Take a lump sum as a loan and use the money for the home improvement project. Once again the interest is a tax deduction however be aware and plan for unexpected costs. It is not unheard of for construction cost to be 20% – 30% more than they were estimated to be. The last thing a homeowner wants is to be in the middle of a large renovation and run out of money. Some of the advantages to renovating are; staying in your home and your neighborhood, personalizing your home to your taste, or creating more space. By adding space to your home it can become more functional and with new windows and insulation more energy efficient. Renovating your home adds value to your home and therefore in the long run will generate more equity. How do I determine how much equity I have in my home? Subtract what you owe on your mortgage from the fair market value of your home. For example if your house is worth $200,000 and you owe $100,000 on your mortgage you have $100,000 in equity. With a loan to value maximum set at 80%. 0.80x $200,000 = $160,000 Therefore you can borrow a total of $160,000 against the home. With an existing mortgage of $100,000 you be then be able to take cash out of up to $60,000. Whats next? Apply for a loan and get your questions answered. Plan and budget your project and make sure you have extra funds available just in case.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://northhaven.patch.com/groups/announcements/p/home-improvement-loan

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